Gilles Tarabout
Directeur de recherche
émérite
Inde
...

Textes

Berti, D. et G. Tarabout, 2018, Through the Lens of the Law. Court Cases and Social Issues in India (s.l., s.n.) [SAMAJ, 17].
Berti, Daniela, Gilles Tarabout et Raphaël Voix (éds), 2016, Filing religion: state, hinduism, and courts of law (New Delhi, Oxford University Press).
Berti, Daniela, Anthony Good et Gilles Tarabout (éds), 2015, Of doubt and proof: ritual and legal practices of judgment (Farnham, Ashgate) [Juris diversitas].
Berti, Daniela et Gilles Tarabout (éds), 2015, Version anglaise de Diogène 239-240 [Les frontières de la loi: justice, pouvoirs et politique] (s.l., s.n.) [Diogenes, 60].
Berti, Daniela et Gilles Tarabout (éds), 2013, Les frontières de la loi: justice, pouvoirs et politique, numéro spécial (Paris, Presses universitaires de France) [Diogène, 239-240].
Dreyfus-Asséo, Sylvie, Gilles Tarabout, Dominique Cupa et Guillemine Chaudoye (éds), 2012, Les ancêtres (Paris/Les Ulis, EDK/EDP sciences) [Pluriels de la psyché].
Berti, D. et G. Tarabout, 2018, Presentation, SAMAJ, 17 [Through the Lens of the Law. Court Cases and Social Issues in India], en ligne : http://journals.openedition.org/samaj/4433.
Tarabout, G., 2018, Ruling on Rituals. Courts of Law and Religious Practices in Contemporary Hinduism, SAMAJ, 17 [Through the Lens of the Law. Court Cases and Social Issues in India], en ligne : http://journals.openedition.org/samaj/4451.
Berti, D. et G. Tarabout, 2015, Pratiques de justice. Catégories, procédures, stratégies [traduction en chinois], Diogenes (édition en chinois), 2015-1 [Les Frontières de la loi. Justice, pouvoirs et politique] : 81-94.
Berti, D. et G. Tarabout, 2015, Religion et environnement dans les procédures judiciaires en Inde, Les Cahiers de la justice, 3 : 409-420, en ligne : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01246138.
Tarabout, G., 2015, Spots of Wilderness. "Nature" in the Hindu Temples of Kerala, Rivista degli Studi Orientali, NS 88 (supplemento 2) : 23-43, en ligne : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01306640.
Many Hindu temples in Kerala are called 'groves' (kāvu), and encapsulate an effective grove – a small spot where shrubs and trees are said to grow 'wildly'. There live numerous divine entities, serpent gods and other ambivalent deities or ghosts, subordinated to the presiding god/goddess of the temple installed in the main shrine. The paper discusses this situation along two main lines. One is to trace the presence of these groves and of their dangerous inhabitants to religious ideas found in Kerala about land and deities, and about forests as a major source of divine (wild) power. The other is to point out recent discourses ascribing an antique ecological purpose and consciousness at the origin of temple groves, thus equating ecology with a strictly contained – and tiny – 'wilderness'.
Berti, D. et G. Tarabout, 2014, Practices of Justice. Categories, Procedures and Strategies, Diogenes, 60 (3-4) : 3-11, en ligne : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01246833.
This collection of studies aims to contribute to a better understanding of the relationships between justice and the exercise of power in various societies of Africa, Asia and Europe. The growing awareness that we have of judicial practices around the world leads to a renewed questioning of their link with the actual power relationships structuring the socio-political field.
Berti, D. et G. Tarabout, 2013, Pratiques de justice. Catégories, procédures, stratégies, Diogène, Les Frontières de la loi. Justice, pouvoirs et politique (239-240) : 3-15.
Tarabout, G. et D. Berti, 2017, Questioning the Truth: Ideals of Justice and Trial Techniques in India, Truth, Intentionality and Evidence. Anthropological Approaches to Crime (Abington, Routledge) : 10-27.
Tarabout, G., 2017, Charlemagne en pays malabar. Enjeux locaux, Mémoire épique et Génie du lieu (Lille, CeGes) : 317-328.
Tarabout, G., 2016, Birth vs Merit. Kerala’s Temple Priests and the Courts, Filing Religion. State, Hinduism, and Courts of Law (New Delhi, Oxford University Press) : 3-33, en ligne : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01341078.
The Indian and the Nepalese Constitutions posit a separation between a secular domain regulated by the state and a religious domain in which it must not interfere. However, defining the difference between the two has proved difficult. Moreover, the state is directly and increasingly involved in various ways in the direct administration of many religious institutions. Given that the legal status of Hindu idols is recognized, deities may sue or be sued; and the courts are frequently asked to decide on various rights linked to religious functions and bodies. Such decisions often have a far-reaching impact on rituals and on religious specialists, and contribute to (re)defining religious categories and practices. Indeed, it is our view that the courts' apparently ‘technical’, legalistic action actually shapes the place religion occupies in Indian and Nepalese society, perhaps even more so than the ideology of any political party.
Tarabout, G. et D. Berti, 2016, La vérité en question. Idéal de justice et techniques judiciaires en Inde, Autour du crime (Paris, L’Herne) : 117-134, en ligne : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01343829.
Tarabout, G., 2015, Religious uncertainty, astrology, and the courts (South-India), Of doubt and proof: ritual and legal practices of judgment (Farnham, Ashgate) : 59-75.
Good, A., D. Berti et G. Tarabout, 2015, Introduction: Technologies of doubt in law and ritual, Of doubt and proof: ritual and legal practices of judgment (Farnham, Ashgate) : 1-17 [Juris diversitas].
Tarabout, G. et C. Jaffrelot, 2014, Les transformations de l’hindouisme, L’Inde contemporaine: de 1990 à aujourd’hui (Paris, Fayard).
Tarabout, G., 2012, Sin and Flaws in Kerala Temple Astrology, Sins and sinners: perspectives from Asian religions (Leyde, Brill) : 309-323.
Indian concepts for which the terms 'sin' and 'expiation' are regularly given are respectively pāpa and prāyaścitta (Skt.). They are often associated with the notion of karma: briefly said, the misfortune which one experiences may be explained as being the consequence of one's own acts committed in a previous life and those past actions are termed 'sinful' in English translations. A 'sinner' may however alleviate to some extent the consequences of his 'sins' by practicing 'expiations'. Put into English in this vocabulary, things look familiar, perhaps a bit too much. My argument is that in the context of astrology, what is rendered as 'sin' or 'expiation' corresponds to a more ambivalent conception of wrong deeds, of their consequences, and of the solutions they call for, than what may be found in Christian-inspired cultures. This suggests in turn that the contrast drawn between 'the 'transcendental' and the 'practical' aspects of religion, may not be a very fruitful one.
Berti, D. et G. Tarabout, 2012, Criminal Proceedings in India and the Question of Culture. An Anthropological Perspective, Rechtsanalyse als Kulturforschung (s.l., Vittorio Klostermann) : 193-206, en ligne : https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00870593/document.
The history of the Indian legal order shows an intricate construction of institutions and codifications which relate to the British legal system, to Hindu or Muslim traditions (partly reinvented), and, since independence, to various international interactions. The question of culture - local, religious, or national- has thus regularly been at the core of juristic concerns, whether to leave place to aspects of personal law according to more or less reified representations of culture, or to impose a reformist legal agenda. Scholarship in this domain has followed two main trends: one is the study of the cultural components of Indian law; the other is the study of the cultural use of the Courts. The present chapter aims at presenting another, less explored, approach, focusing on Court proceedings and how they tackle with the cultural components of the cases to be decided in practice.
Tarabout, G., 2012, Quelques conceptions de la personne et de l’ancestralité en Inde, Les Ancêtres (Paris, Éditions médicales et scientifiques) : 53-61.
A partir d'une réflexion préliminaire sur un tableau de Courbet figurant un chêne centenaire, choisi pour l'affiche d'un colloque sur "Les Ancêtres" réunissant anthropologues et psychanalystes, et dont est issu cet ouvrage, il s'agit de mettre à jour quels modèles possibles pourraient rendre compte des diverses conceptions de l'ancestralité que l'on rencontre en Inde. Deux aspects sont ainsi mis en avant. D'une part, les conceptions de l'ancestralité sont diverses : elles se côtoient et interagissent dans une même région, dans un même village, et présentent un caractère parfois éclaté, voire hétérogène, pour une même personne. D'autre part, les représentations sous-jacentes mettent l'accent sur des liens et des circulations. Certes, elles prennent des formes différentes parmi les hautes castes ou parmi les basses castes, mais dans les deux cas la vision qui domine repose moins sur des images d'enracinement ou de ramification, que sur celles de chaîne ou de cycle.
Tarabout, G., 2014, L’absence du cerveau dans les représentations du corps en Inde, Les imaginaires du cerveau: [séminaire, Grenoble, 2011-2012] (Fernelmont, E.M.E.) : 31-51.
Tarabout, G. et D. Berti, 2014, De l’Etat colonial à la mondialisation du droit. Institution judiciaire, gouvernement, et société en Inde, Actes du colloque ANR Gouverner et administrer (Paris, s.n.) : 44-50, en ligne : http://www.agence-nationale-recherche.fr/fileadmin/documents/2014/gouverner-administrer-anr-janvier-2014.pdf.

Communications

Tarabout, G. et D. Berti, 2013, « Organisation », colloque international "Through the Lens of Law : Power and Society in India", Paris.
Tarabout, G., 2018, « Compassion for Animals in Indian Law Courts », conférence internationale "Buddhist Beasts: Reflections on Animals in Asian Religions and Culture", Université de la British Columbia, Vancouver.
Tarabout, G., 2017, « Beyond Policies: Religious Practices and Civil Rights in India », conférence internationale "Entanglements of Law and Religion in South Asia", Annual Conference of the South Asian Studies Council, Yale University, USA.
Tarabout, G. et D. Berti, 2017, « Président et discutant », panel, conférence international "Taking Nature to the Courtroom in South Asia", Université d’Edinburgh, Royaume-Uni.
Tarabout, G. et D. Berti, 2015, « Intervention », Ruling on Rituals. Indian Judges and Religious Practices in Contemporary Hinduism, Yale University-USA.
Tarabout, G. et D. Berti, 2015, « Questioning the Truth. Ideals of Justice and Trial Techniques in India », colloque international "Truth, intentionality and evidence: anthropological approaches to crime and tort", Centre Jacques Berque, Rabat-Maroc.
Tarabout, G., 2015, « Ruling on Rituals. Indian Judges and Religious Practices in Contemporary Hinduism », Department of Religious Studies, Yale University, USA.
Tarabout, G. et D. Berti, 2014, « De l’État colonial à la mondialisation du droit. Institution judiciaire, gouvernement et société en Inde », colloque de restitution ANR Gouverner et administrer, Paris.
Tarabout, G., 2013, « (Un)spoken Values in Judgments. Cases from South India, communication », colloque international "Through the Lens of Law : Power and Society in India", Paris.
Tarabout, G., 2013, « The Lord in a Mango Stone. Human Opinion and the Manifestation of Gods (South India) », conférence internationale "Materiality and Transcendence", Yale, USA.
Tarabout, G., 2013, « Spots of Wilderness. "Nature" in the Hindu Temples of Kerala, communication », conférence internationale "The Human Person and Nature in Classical and Modern India", Rome, Italie.

Multimédia

Tarabout, G., 2013, Entretien avec Alain Morel, DVD (La huit, ministère de la Culture) [L’ethnologie en héritage].

Dans les médias

Tarabout, G., [sans date], Site web de programme ANR, Just-India, en ligne : http://www.just-india.net/.